“AIR FORCE BIRTHDAY”

AIR FORCE BIRTHDAY – September 18

The Air Force Birthday on September 18th commemorates the establishment of The United States Air Force.

Almost from the moment the Wright brothers found a way to soar with the birds, the military incorporated aeronautical pursuits into their missions. However, the Air Force did not become a separate branch of the Armed Forces until September 18, 1947.

The military established the Signal Corps as the first aeronautical force in the United States. During the Civil War, the first missions provided visional communications via flags and torchlight from aerial balloons. Even so, the Signal Corps didn’t become an official branch of the Army until 1863. Its creation made way for more aeronautical training and study.

Since then, military air service has gone through many names and commands. A few examples are the Air Service of the US Army, the Air Corps, and the Army Air Force. Finally, in 1947, President Truman signed the National Security Act establishing the United States Air Force as a separate branch of the military.

As a result of pursuing advanced technology and superior airmen, the US Air Force emerged as the swiftest tactical force ready to deploy anywhere at a moment’s notice. On September 18, celebrate the airmen and women who are on watch every day.

HOW TO OBSERVE #AirForceBirthday

Recognize the military personnel in the Air Force. Give a shout-out and share your experiences as part of the Air Force. Use #AirForceBirthday to post on social media.

AIR FORCE BIRTHDAY HISTORY

The 1947 National Security Act restructured The United States military and intelligence agencies in the aftermath of World War II.  On September 18, 1947, President Truman signed the National Security Act establishing the U.S. Airforce on board the first Air Force One, a VC 54C.


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“NATIONAL APPLE DUMPLING DAY”

NATIONAL APPLE DUMPLING DAY - September 17

National Apple Dumpling Day on September 17th honors a sweet delight of Autumn.

With fall fast approaching, this food holiday comes at the height of apple harvests. Apple dumplings are an easy dessert to make. Simply peel and core apples, season them with cinnamon and sugar and wrap them up in a prepared pastry dough. Then bake the apple until tender. The flavor is similar to an apple pie. 

Apple dumplings are believed to be native to the northeastern United States, around Pennsylvania.  Often found among the delicious Amish recipes, it is frequently eaten as a breakfast item, too. However, they are also regularly eaten as a dessert and sometimes served with ice cream.

Quote mark
Autumn…the year’s last, loveliest smile. ~ John Howard Bryant

Not only do these pastries taste and smell like fall, but they look like it, too. First, the bright apples in their many colors come into our kitchens by the baskets and boxes full. Then we season them with warm-colored spices. Finally, when the pastry comes out of the oven filling our home with that delicious fragrance, it presents us with a gorgeous golden crust.

HOW TO OBSERVE #AppleDumplingDay

Celebrate the day by baking up a fresh order of apple dumplings. We even have recipes you can test. Perhaps you can enjoy eating some apple dumplings while watching the 1975 Walt Disney movie, The Apple Dumpling Gang. Visit your local bakery and order their apple dumpling. When you do, be sure to give them a shout-out!

Try these recipes for breakfast, snack or dessert!

Mountain Dew Apple Dumpling
Apple Dumpling Cake

Use #AppleDumplingDay to post on social media.

NATIONAL APPLE DUMPLING DAY HISTORY

National Day Calendar continues to seek the source of this food holiday.


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“CONSTITUTION DAY AND CITIZENSHIP DAY”

CONSTITUTION DAY AND CITIZENSHIP DAY – September 17

Constitution Day and Citizenship Day on September 17th commemorates the adoption of the Constitution of the United States and those who have become United States citizens. On this day, members of the U.S. Constitutional Convention signed the Constitution in 1787.

Constitutional Convention 

While many contributed to crafting the document known today as the U.S. Constitution, James Madison wrote the draft forming the basis for the Constitution. Those who participated in its development gathered in Independence Hall in Philadelphia that sultry summer of 1787. George Washington presided over the Convention. But many “Founding Fathers” attended to other diplomatic duties, unable to participate. Thomas Jefferson, the author of the Declaration of Independence, served overseas on behalf of his country. John Adams also served abroad. However, Patrick Henry refused to attend due to principle and preferring the Articles of Confederation. Others eventually swayed Henry when convention leaders added a Bill of Rights.

When is Bill of Rights Day?

The convention lasted from May 25 to September 17, 1787. During that time, the 55 delegates debated the duties of the government, checks, and balances, and the rights and freedoms of the people. They divided the government into three branches: the legislative branch to make the laws; the executive to execute the laws, and the judicial to interpret the laws.

The delegates suffered through rough weather, heat, and illness. Despite the conditions, they formed a Bill of Rights enumerating the rights and freedoms of the people.

Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and George Washington all signed the Constitution.

On December 7, 1787, Delaware became the first state to ratify the Constitution. So the process began, obtaining each state’s approval. Rhode Island didn’t send any delegates to the Constitutional Convention. Their headstrong character did not appreciate a powerful government and held tight to their independence as long as they could. As a result, they were the last state to ratify the Constitution on May 29, 1790.

Citizenship

The 14th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution defines citizenship as “All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside.” On July 28, 1868, Secretary of State William Seward proclaimed the amendment ratified.

While the 14th Amendment was the first step in a long line of amendments defining citizens and their rights, it took decades to enforce some of those rights.

For example, one of a citizen’s most valued powers is the power to vote. The 15th and 19th Amendments define those rights for blacks and women. However, it wasn’t until 1924 that all Native Americans were granted citizenship. Through the Indian Citizenship Act, many Native Americans were allowed to vote for the first time. Still, this legislation did not stop some states from preventing some from voting.

HOW TO OBSERVE #ConstitutionDay or #CitizenshipDay

Learn more about the U.S. Constitution and the process of becoming a citizen in the United States. Explore the history of the Constitution. Study the people who brought the Constitution to life and the road to its ratification. 

While you’re exploring, use #ConstitutionDay or #CitizenshipDay to post on social media. 

Educators, families, and students, visit the National Day Calendar Classroom for more ways to Celebrate Every Day!

CONSTITUTION DAY HISTORY

This holiday dates all the way back to 1911 when schools in Iowa first recognized Constitution Day. Then in 1917, the society known as the Sons of the American Revolution formed a committee to promote Constitution Day. Members of that committee included Calvin Coolidge, John D. Rockefeller, and General John Pershing.

In 1940, President Franklin D. Roosevelt declared “I am an American Day,” and Congress designated the third Sunday in May to celebrate it. By 1949, the governors of all 48 states had issued Constitution Day proclamations.  On February 29, 1952, Congress changed the name from “I am an American Day” to “Citizenship Day” and moved its observation to September 17.  In 2004, the day was renamed Constitution Day and Citizenship Day.


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“MAYFLOWER DAY”

MAYFLOWER DAY – September 16

Mayflower Day commemorates the day the ship set sail from Plymouth, England in 1620. On September 16 of 1620, the Mayflower set sail from Plymouth, England with 102 souls on board. These colonists- men, women, children, some seeking fortune, some seeking religious freedom – were later known as pilgrims.

The colonists’ intended to land in Virginia. However, after 66 days at sea, storms and winds blew them off course. After spotting modern-day Cape Cod, the members of the Mayflower intended on exploring the mouth of the Hudson River. However, rough seas continued to plague the ship. They turned back and stayed at Cape Cod.

For the next few weeks, the Pilgrims explored Cape Cod and eventually settled on Plymouth for their plantation.

HOW TO OBSERVE #MayflowerDay

Learn more about the journey of the Mayflower. Visit Plymouth Plantation and discover the history surrounding the Mayflower. Learn more about the voyage and those who made the journey. Find out about their decisions and the making of the settlement. Read from their journals and walk in their footsteps. 

You can also watch a documentary or read about the Mayflower. The Mayflower and Her Passengers by Caleb H. Johnson and The Mayflower: A Story of Courage, Community and War by Nathaniel Philbrick will both bring you inside the stories of the Pilgrims.

Use #MayflowerDay to post on social media.

MAYFLOWER DAY HISTORY

This day commemorates the day the Mayflower set sail for the New World. At the time, William Bradford, the separatist leader whose journal historians often reference for Mayflower history, recorded dates according to the Julian calendar.  At that point in history, the world used both the Julian and the Gregorian (the calendar most often used today). The 10-day difference between the two calendars accounts for the different dates across historical documents of the Mayflower’s departure from Plymouth, England.


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“There is Today , and YOUR Best Memories”

“You are only as young as you once remember… and that is only if you  can remember those best of times… which more than likely have long ago past you bye… bye!”

and…


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“NATIONAL ANTS ON A LOG DAY”

NATIONAL ANTS ON A LOG DAY - Second Tuesday in September

The second Tuesday in September each year celebrates National Ants On A Log Day. This day recognizes this iconic and healthy food snack enjoyed by millions of people across the USA and around the world.

We make this delicious snack by spreading peanut butter on celery and placing raisins on top.  The snack name was first used in the 1950s.  The typical peanut butter version of ants on a log is recommended as a healthy snack by the McKinley Health Center at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. How healthy is it? We’ve outlined each ingredient to give you an idea. 

Raisins add a little sweetness to snack time while also providing vitamin C, selenium, and zinc. They’re also low in sodium and are a good source of potassium, making them great for blood pressure. Another healthy benefit of raisins includes iron, copper, and magnesium. Coupled with potassium, these pH-balancing minerals help keep stomach acid in order.

The next layer, peanut butter, is an excellent source of protein. Along with that, peanut butter offers a boost of healthy fat, too.

Finally, crispy celery is low in calories. But that’s not all! In the crunch of celery, you’ll find fiber, folate, potassium, and vitamin K. Not only is it low in calories, but it doesn’t have any of the fat and cholesterol other snack foods have either.

Early September is a time when kids are headed back to school and more importantly, back to studying. To keep them (and their parents) fueled with brain food is an important tool for staying focused.  The designation is to celebrate and encourage healthy snacking using one of the most iconic treats that both old and new generations enjoy.

HOW TO OBSERVE #NationalAntsOnALogDay

No matter where you are, ants on a log makes the perfect snack. Make some for work or home. Send them to school or daycare. Make extra for an after-school, after-work treat. Prepare yours and share using #NationalAntsOnALogDay to post on social media.

National Ants On A Log Day - 2nd Tuesday in September

ANTS ON A LOG DAY HISTORY

In 2014, Duda Farm Fresh Foods and Peanut Butter & Co. submitted National Ants on a Log Day to recognize the nutritious and delicious snack. 


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