“New York Cheesecake”

Recipe of the Day

New York Cheesecake
Prep:  25 minutes
Cook:  45 minutes
Total Prep:  70 minutes
Servings:  6-8

Ingredients:

Crust:
1 – 1/2 cups graham cracker crumbs
6 tablespoons melted butter
1/4 cup powdered sugar

Filling:
8 ounces cream cheese
2 large eggs
3/4 cup sugar
2 tablespoons cornstarch
1 cup sour cream

Topping:
1 cup sour cream
3/4 cup sugar

Instructions:

First Prepare Crust:

Mix graham cracker crumbs, butter, and 1/4 cup powdered sugar.

Press into a well greased, 9-inch springform pan.

Spread up the side and along the bottom of the pan.

Place in freezer and chill for 5 to 10 minutes.

Next prepare filling:

Heat oven to 400°.

In a medium bowl, mix cream cheese and 3/4 cup sugar until smooth.

Add eggs, vanilla, and cornstarch and mix well.

Stir in  1 cup sour cream.

Pour the mixture into the cooled crust and bake for 45 minutes.

Turn off the oven and let cool 3 hours with the door slightly ajar.

Refrigerate overnight.

Prepare topping (before serving):

Combine 1 cup sour cream and 3/4 cup sugar.

Pour over chilled cheesecake before serving.


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“CINCO DE MAYO”

CINCO DE MAYO – May 5

Cinco De May’s deeply rooted history in the Franco-Mexican War influenced Mexican-Mexican American communities in the early years of the American Civil War. In the early 1860s, as the Civil War erupted, these communities took up the banner of the Cinco De Mayo celebration as a way to commemorate the cause of freedom and democracy. Today, in the United States, Americans celebrate Mexican-American heritage and pride annually on May 5th.

Cinco de Mayo is Spanish for “fifth of May.”

On June 7, 2005, the United States Congress issued a Concurrent Resolution. The resolution invited the President of the United States to issue a proclamation calling upon the people of the United States to observe Cinco de Mayo with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

According to José Alamillo, professor of ethnic studies at Washington State University in Pullman, a 2006 study found more than 150 official events celebrating the day.

Celebrations surrounding the observance in the United States take on a significance beyond that in Mexico. They include displaying of banners and events highlighting Mexican culture, music, and regional dancing. School districts also hold special events to educate students about its historical significance. In the U.S., commercial interests the day by celebrating Mexican products and services with an emphasis on beverages, food, and music.

HOW TO OBSERVE #CincodeMayo

Celebrate Mexican heritage, culture, and history. Explore foods and traditions, music, and cinema. Immerse yourself in the language and discover new connections. Uncover long lost history and share your treasures. Share your Mexican heritage and use #CincodeMayo to post on social media.

CINCO DE MAYO HISTORY

In 1861, the Battle of Puebla pitched 6,000 French troops against a small, under-supplied Mexican force of 2,000 men. Not expecting to win the campaign, the Mexican army overcame the French in under a day. While the battle didn’t win the war, the victory held great symbolism for Mexico during the Franco-Mexican War and buoyed the army throughout the conflict. Each year, Mexico commemorates the day with celebrations across the country, though it is not a federal holiday.


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” D. K. Smith NATIONAL TOOTH FAIRY DAY”

1942

In 1942, in an article written by columnist Bob Balfe in the Palm Beach Post, his children received War Stamps to put in their books when they lost a tooth. It was a popular alternative during a time when giving to the war effort was a motivating factor.

NATIONAL TOOTH FAIRY DAY

February 28th is a day to look back on the history of one of dental care’s little helpers and to keep encouraging our children to develop good dental hygiene.  It’s National Tooth Fairy Day. 

Download this coloring page of the tooth fairy to celebrate!

Like some of the fantastic creations who oversee children, the tooth fairy is a relative newcomer to the world of childhood fantasies.

In the mid-1920s fairies were used for all sorts of health education from bath fairies to fresh air fairies as a way to get kids to remember to eat their vegetables, wash behind their ears and get a good night’s rest. Like toothpaste, today that advertises fruity flavors and sparkles to get kids excited to brush their teeth, in 1925 it was probably quite a bit more difficult considering the pastes were mostly peroxide and baking soda. One advertisement was for a Fairy Wand Tooth Whitener. This product promised to brush away cigarette and coffee stains.  The ad was aimed at both children and adults, we hope!

Then in 1927, Esther Watkins Arnold printed an eight-page playlet for children called The Tooth Fairy. It was the same year Sir Arthur Conan Doyle “proved” his claim that fairies and gnomes are real and “verified” with pictures of two little girls surrounded by fairies. The world was ripe with imagination and primed to have a tooth fairy about to come collect the lost teeth of little boys and girls and leave a coin or two behind.

Arnold’s play began to be performed in schools the following year, and the tooth fairy has been slipping into homes ever since.  She (or he) started leaving nickels and dimes under the pillows of sleeping children. Over the years there have been variations on the theme.

 In 1942, in an article written by columnist Bob Balfe in the Palm Beach Post, his children received War Stamps to put in their books when they lost a tooth.  It was a popular alternative during a time when giving to the war effort was a motivating factor.  

Today, the tooth fairy jingles much less than ever.  The average payout for a lost tooth ranges from $3 to $4 and can go even higher if Dad is on duty or if the tooth is lost late at night with no time for a parent to run to an ATM.

HOW TO OBSERVE

Use #NationalToothFairyDay to post on social media.  Download our coloring page of the tooth fairy, color and post to Social Media.

HISTORY

 While our research did not unearth the source of either the February 28 or the August 22 observance, it is interesting to note the American Dental Association’s recommendation to have cleanings twice annually.

D. K. Smith  D. K. Smith


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“Magic Door”

from little Tommy… xoxoxoxo

and…

 

Watch again with friends… xoxoxoxo


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“After Thanksgiving …What To do” “Start Walking”

“3 Cheers – for the COOKS!”

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“HIP- HIP!  HOORAY!”  “3 CHEERS  – for the COOKS!”

Sure hope that you remembered to say  “THANKS” for whoever made the best of meals this year, and that  you were there to enjoy all of those special selected   and only once a year foods that always put a hundred extra pounds of muscle on … since you will be sitting and sitting … since they taste so good, you just… can not move yourself away from the table…and  join others who have more sense …  as they are having  lots of “FUN” mingling  around the  great outdoors with others… making room for some great desserts!

This picture was taken several years ago and this senior chef with her very  young and helpful assistant, Alyssa  is  also  my Granddaughter of two very loving children…my  extra special great-grandchildren… so,  the two of us pulled off another big feast   for all of those up at the Airport  and for everyone  just flying in …to enjoy???

In this picture you can see,  that it does not  pay to wear  something   “all white” and then have the nerve to stand near the refrigerator???  

This  is not  the best of pictures, since it is also a copy  and … I will have to locate the original…  just to see who’s… who and what’s… what???  

 This is a quick item… since we are still doing things with the last of  one of the  biggest old turkeys!

Sometimes “Turkeys” can last longer…  than you want…  but… they do make good sandwiches, when we are all  in a hurry!

 Hope that you are also… enjoying the last of your “Turkey! …     …. TOO???


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“AVIATION HISTORY MONTH”

Aviation History Month - November

When it comes to Aviation History Month in November, there’s plenty to celebrate. From the first balloons sent up into the atmosphere to every device invented that elevated humans above the earth, our imaginations have been captured by the idea of flight. Aviation History Month recognizes the achievements of the men and women who make it happen.

AVIATORS IN HISTORY

Looking back, many of us quickly identify Wilbur and Orville Wright. However, long before the brothers took to the air, others were lifting off in other devices. In fact, the Wrights were inspired by these inventive pioneers in aviation. For example, Otto Lilienthal built gliders and flew them near Berlin, Germany. His very invention aided the Wright brothers in the design of a powered aeroplane.

When is National Aviation Day?

Another notable figure in aviation history many will name is Amelia Erhardt. While she earned many records, the one record she never successfully circumnavigated the globe. The first woman to gain that honor was Geraldine Mock. In 1964, Jerrie Mock completed her feat in twenty-nine days, eleven hours, and fifty-nine minutes. She flew a Cessna 180 named the “Spirit of Columbus.”

In 1941, The 99th Pursuit Squadron was activated at Tuskegee comprised of black pilots and ground crews. They became known as the Tuskegee Airmen, a segregated military unit. Because the NAACP had forced the military’s hand, the airmen were undertrained and expected to fail. Though they did not perform at the same level as their counterparts, they completed their missions and met demands while overcoming obstacles. As a result, they led the way for integrated units in the U.S. Air Force.

HOW TO OBSERVE #AviationHistoryMonth

Do you remember the first time you flew in an airplane? For some it’s the most exhilarating experience and for others it’s nerve-wracking. Explore aviation history, the people, the places and the technology. There are numerous ways to learn aviation history, too.

  • Read a book about aviation.
  • Visit an aviation museum.
  • Talk to a pilot or go for a ride in an airplane.
  • Listen to a podcast about aviation history.
  • Watch a video about aviation history.
  • Find an airshow event near you.

No matter how you celebrate, be sure to use #AviationHistoryMonth to post on social media.

AVIATION HISTORY MONTH HISTORY

We were unable to identify the source of Aviation History Month.

There are over 1,500 national days. Don’t miss a single one. Celebrate Every Day with National Day Calendar®!


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